Standing stones and nerdy day trips

Kartographic – a KLF map (via b3ta. See also Stoned again?, Jonathan Key’s review of Cope’s epic The Modern Antiquarian: A Pre-millennial Odyssey Through Megalithic Britain. The site and blog is now a massive resource, a rambling journal of discoveries and links and lines. Mystical nostalgia isn’t a very visible strand of modern life, squashed by the much nearer, more immediate and visceral consumer nostalgia for past products and things. Ever since Alfred Watkins invented the idea of the ley line, the idea of quasi-invisible associations between people, places and things has become part of the culture. Later researchers decided that Watkins’ ley lines were a manifestation of unexplained energy and other ‘earth mysteries‘, a concept that finds a lot of traction at The Modern Antiquarian. Yet the romance of landscape has evolved from a romance of place and association and composition – as demonstrated in the landscape art tradition – into a top down cartographical romance. Instead, we have online spaces like the Nerdy Day Trip map (initiated by Ben Goldacre, via Strange Maps). The mystical web of ley lines and symbolic landscapes has given over to a virtual mysticism, where places no longer have to be physically experienced to have meaning. The above image is from British Landscape Printmaking 1750-1880, a ‘survey of printmaking and the development of a printed iconography in the romantic era’.

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Other things. Brimborium, a traditional ‘flotsam and jetsam’ gathering weblog / some wonderful old school reminiscences about the early days of computer graphics at this MeFi post on a computer animation by Edwin Catmull and Fred Parke / nice editing job: Close-up: Nepal’s love for Bryan Adams hit Summer of ’69 / discover the world’s ups and downs using Google Correlate (via MeFi) / related, 300 Lines, a collaborative drawing project / Notes From An Even Smaller Island, all about Steep Holm, a small island in the Bristol Channel (see Steep Holm Diary). It lies next to Flat Holm, another bleak outpost with a history of religion, war and disease.

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A MeFi round-up of Arnold Odermatt’s Karambolage online / there is a Sea Glass Journal (found via MeFi). It has a Shard of the Month section / artwork by James Clar using light / a design blog by Oli Phillips / Maggie Williams is a fine artist / Venice in the 1890s / the Carbuncle Cup winner is underwhelmingly ugly, i.e. not ugly enough. The ‘competition’ has always been dismissed as a bit of architectural snobbery, so perhaps the 2011 result is a more measured, critical approach and not the bitter shotgun blast at a barrel it was in the past.

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Architectural illustration by Josh Cochran / Art of the Title, amazing work that frequently surpasses the film that follows / crikey. Tumblr followers just grow exponentially at a certain point: Portrait of the artist as a young man / chaho, design and things from Japan / Always Searching, creative inspiration / L’ecurie, an ‘Atelier d’expérimentations plastiques’ / B.Mannie, illustration by Melanie Boullard / Glitter as I grew / Florida Shadows, photography / Future Noir, Blade Runner and only Blade Runner / The Mind’s Imaginings / Attentive / Remarkable, old illustrations / Dream Things / Rametes / Jayki.

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David Galbraith on the relationship between the work and studios of Steve Jobs and Norman Foster. Both Foster and Jobs are adept at translating their aesthetic into a brand and then getting others to roll out ‘their’ vision. It’s an object lesson in how branding works, especially as both have retained unassailable positions as creative visionaries and utter detail fetishists. In reality, being able to micromanage countless details across hundreds of projects and/or products is an impossibility, but what’s interesting is that neither man has done anything to counter this, preferring to let a mythological quality grow up around them. See also Dieter Rams, whose claim to total authorship is perhaps slightly more authentic, given the relative functional simplicity of the products he oversaw. (via Kottke)

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Holiday Architecture. Take a break in something unusual / Cult Pens is fine reading for the nib obsessive. They also have a blog. See also Pen Addict / paintings by David Baker / the art of the clean up. Witty mash-up of art project and real-life Photoshopping / Cave Story is a cult platform game / the WTC under construction / making Fallingwater in Minecraft (via fat).

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