Photography, tumblrs and more

Meditations on Photographs: A Car on Fire at the Mall by JM Colberg: ‘The act of photographing, the gesture, has become part of our interaction with the world. You photograph just like you look. You know that you can never look at all of those photographs again (in all likelihood you never will – who has the time?), but it’s not about the photographs – it’s about the photographing. The act of photography might have turned into the equivalent of whistling a song, something you do, something that might or might not have beauty, a communicative act just as much as an affirmative act: I was there, and me being there means I had to photograph it.’ / Owen Hatherley on Photography and Modern Architecture / see also Hatherley on the travails of Preston Bus Station.

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Other things / the tweets of dead design icons / a cardboard landscape in Chile, photographed by Cristobal Palma and designed by Lyon Bosch Arquitectos / a literal Beet Box, a project by Scott / Elite video game reboot hits funding target / two posts on cities and the imagination: Twelve Missives from the Roi des Belges, a MeFi post compiling the first year’s creative activity around David Kohn’s Room for London. And Cities and the Soul, a hugely comprehensive celebration of Italo Calvino’s Invisible Cities.

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Yet more anti-iconism (a burgeoning trend?): Why Is This Museum Shaped Like a Tub? The NYT on Amsterdam’s Stedelijk Museum / see also Zaha Hadid vs. the Pirates. Bootleg buildings sail into China / tumblr round-up: boats against the current / artificialblood / gedaechtnispalast / Sæglópur / Monkey Flow Scuba.gram / wool + bricks / Kontrollhamster.

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Step back in musical time with Tim Pope’s video archive. David Bowie has also posted prolifically in recent months, leading up to today’s unexpected new release / see also the portrait of Bowie carved by artist Wilfrid Wood / Fast Company publishes a gallery of images by Filip Dujardin / Disassociated, an excellent weblog.

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