Making the landscape work

The Wind Tunnel, by Katie MacDonald and Kyle Schumann, the PV Tensegrity Forest by Kyuseon Hong and WooJae Sung and The Energy Diamond Sculpture, by William Badrick, just a few of many, many submissions at the Land Art Generator Initiative, an art-into-power organisation established to solicit the ‘design and construct[ion of] public art installations that have the added benefit of large scale clean energy generation. Each sculpture will continuously distribute clean energy into the electrical grid, with each having the potential to provide power to thousands of homes.’ Clean energy by stealth, although the confluence of public art projects and environmentally friendly technology is unlikely to win many friends in certain sectors of the American media.

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Collages by Todd Bartel, whose own blog is a fascinating piece of art history, ‘an ongoing effort to define the relationship between collage and landscape painting’. We also like his Real Landscapes series and Witness Series (above) / Hyperkit have created a new site for Retrouvius, high-end salvage specialists / a pretty hefty overview of 2012′s best design books. Today’s monographs are tomorrow’s Pinterest, Tumblr and ffffound fodder / How a high-rise craze is ruining London’s skyline. The jury is very much out on the Walkie-Talkie, aka 20 Fenchurch Street, which will struggle to overcome its proportions, and as the article notes, the Vauxhall Tower achieves the rare distinction of making that particular stretch of river even less distinguished than it was to start with.

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A lovely proposal for the Kofun new national stadium in Japan by Dorell Ghotmeh Tane / The 12 Desks of Christmas. Guess the owner of the desk, win books, courtesy of Laurence King Publishing / photography by Karen Miranda / Revista, a tumblr / The Overstuffed Chair, a weblog / the New Yorker launches Double Take, ‘timely notes from the archive’.

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One Response to Making the landscape work

  1. “the confluence of public art projects and environmentally friendly technology is unlikely to win many friends in certain sectors of the American media.”

    Mostly because they will combine ugliness, stupidity, and crap art thinking.

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