Here be dragons

Recycle: Joy Division and New Order – the Factory years, an almost forensic reconstruction of a back catalogue. ‘All tracks were taken from the best/earliest possible sources to avoid modern mastering techniques which crush the dynamics.’ We especially like the way new box sets are being designed and made to cater for this ultra-low volume production, all very much in the spirit of Factory’s house style (and presumably just as labour intensive) / related, the Factory Records Archive and the very welcome counterblast of FUC51, ‘Madchester deniers’.

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A steampunk record player / X-plane-O-rama, all the X’s / the latest blog into book, David Horvitz’s everything that can happen in a day / tomblr, a tumblr with a focus on the architectural model / qualis artifex pereo, a tumblr of things / dj misc, a site of quotes and clippings / the Map of Metal. Here be dragons. And dragon-themed, bombastic symphonic grindcore / an absolutely colossal page of car cutaway drawings (via me-fi). See also Automotive Illustrations / the World Telephone Numbering Guide, including a history.

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Some websites are a bit like stumbling over an old magazine at the bottom of a box or the back of a cupboard. Merzhase is a case in point. Abandoned for three years, the archives bring up all sort of forgotten memories as well as fresh things we were unfamiliar with, like the imaginary dioramas of Josh Keyes and the art of Antony Micallef (occasionaly nsfw) / the blog at Mark Batty Publishers / Boiteaoutils, ‘architectural political narratives’ / This City Called Earth, a tumblr / Cognitive Cities, a weblog and Conference / a shrine to Jonathan Meades.

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41Latitude asks Why Do Google Maps’s City Labels Seem Much More “Readable” Than Those of Its Competitors? (via kottke) / related, new Google Maps for Mobile includes 3D cityscapes / launching ships sideways / Sequence-non, a tumblr / darkwave surfer, a tumblr / Recollexion, a tumblr / Letter to Jane, a digital magazine / animated films for grown-ups.

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Fake concept art, but fun all the same, a Russian Flying Fortress, vast aerial structure inspired by the real-life (and still remarkable) Kalinin k-7 / see also modelling at kampfgruppe144 and Fantastic Plastic, ‘Amazing Aircraft and Spacecraft Model Kits from the 20th and 21st Centuries’, including Norman Bel Geddes Airliner No. 4. Along with Luigi Colani, Bel Geddes was utterly cavalier about practicalities like realism and physics.

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