Come fly the friendly seas

Minimal Details, an ongoing series that fetishises/lauds the simple, unpretentious and functional architectural detail (via Space Invading). A sort of ascetic companion to this / The Pixies have a new website / Madame Saqui at Vauxhall, 1820, at Uncertain Times, via unpalombaro. See also Funambulus / Funambule: Rope Walkers & Equilibrists, ‘a Potted History Using Quotes and Anecdotes Through the Centuries’ at The Blondin Memorial Trust. See also The Flying Wallendas.

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Wonderstate, a tumblr / curiouser and curiouser, a tumblr / Lights Out, a tumblr / Feit, a tumblr / Banale, a tumblr / yet more Minecraft, as ‘huge, sprawling worlds full of different aesthetics, different weather, different flora and different fauna’ are introduced: video / Mouse Safari, art and chaos / Doggerland, ‘an attempt to remap Europe and claim back the lost territories of the North Sea’, including this celebration of the tough, abstract naval aesthetic of Norman Wilkinson / History in the Unmaking, more historic imagery added to Google Earth.

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Architectural Theory, a magazine / Printeresting, a weblog about print / then and now, the British high street in times gone by / see also Bellenden Road, 22 March 2003. We’ll try and update this before 2013 / Map Crunch is fun, a google streetview teleporter machine / one of taxidermy’s regular revivals is in full swing. We’ve already linked to Polly Morgan, but there’s also the work of Miss Pokeno, aka Alannah Currie, aka The Armchair Destructivist. The fox-embedded-in-armchair is suitably grotesque / archived catalogue covers from French gunsmiths Darne: the one from 1923 and this pan-global slaughter-fest are particularly fine.

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The Latécoère 521 flying boat ‘Lieutenant de Vaisseau Paris‘, from an era when aeroplanes mimicked the space and style of trans-Atlantic liners: ‘On the lower level there was a salon with 20 armchairs and tables, six deluxe double cabins, each with its own bathroom, seating for a further 22 passengers, a kitchen, a bar and a baggage hold. The upper level had seating for 18 passengers, a storage compartment and an office for the three flight engineers’. The plane was followed by the Latécoère 631. Visit Seawings.co.uk for more on monstrous flying boats, as well as the Pan Am Clipper Boats site.

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