Category Archives: things magazine

New things

Two of our staple daily destinations, Kottke and The Morning News have both unveiled redesigns. In the case of the latter, there’s a greater focus on the links between daily changes, updates, obsessions and events, while Kottke is more concerned … Continue reading

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Things made and unmade

Unbelievably, we have overlooked the excellent Unmaking Things for so many years (link via). Born out of the Royal College of Art / Victoria and Albert Museum History of Design MA course – just like things itself – it is … Continue reading

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Looking back

At some point yesterday, our WordPress stats counter clicked around the magic one million mark. Things has been on WordPress since Spring 2010, some nine years after we followed the weblog herd to Blogger and started posting. Amazing how muddy … Continue reading

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Fire in the hold

Aargh. Apologies for the (enforced) downtime. We’re learning about all sorts of new things, like DDoS attacks and htaccess files. Please don’t stop visiting.

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Going nowhere, slowly

The Blog is Dead, Long Live the Blog, a (deliberately) provocative piece from Kottke, who knows a thing or two about online longevity. It’s hard to disagree with the basic premise that ‘Blogs are for 40-somethings with kids’ when one … Continue reading

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An apology

You may have noticed that things has been limping along for the past few months, with infrequent updates and not a whole lot of enthusiasm and energy (with notable exceptions). We apologise to regular readers but suspect the slide down … Continue reading

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A thing-searcher

‘I don’t know what you’ve got in mind,’ said Pippi, ‘but I’m not the sort to lie around. I’m a thing-searcher, you see. And that means I never have a moment to spare.’ ‘What did you say you were?’ asked … Continue reading

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One of these things is not like the other thing

Happy new year. We’ve had a gratifying amount of feedback to our last post of 2012, a short discussion of the internet of things and the realm of the superficial, the analogy of the curiosity cabinet and its potentially damaging … Continue reading

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Cabinets, cases, collecting and display

And so we find ourselves on the edge of the year, without all that much inclination to look back (that’s a job that others can do with so much more depth and expertise). Things magazine feels increasingly marginal, hovering on … Continue reading

Posted in collections and archives, nostalgia, things magazine | 12 Comments

A short break

things will be (even more) sporadic for a few weeks. Have a nice summer.

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Catalogues and Collections, part 2

/ Things magazine is always looking, but the sad reality is that if it’s not on the internet it doesn’t exist for us. And that’s a problem. Our own archives are a case in point; until we get our house … Continue reading

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Time for Change

The Gunpowder Plot: exploding the legend, a science-y look at what a lot of barrels of Seventeenth Century gunpowder might have done to parliament. Talking of London cellars, apparently the wine cellars of Devonshire House, the London seat of the … Continue reading

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Back issue special offer

We’ve been digging through the archives and it turns out that there aren’t many physical copies of things left. The only issues we are still able to sell are 08, 09, 13, 14, 16, 17/18 and the current issue, 19/20. … Continue reading

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Seasons greetings

things is on a seasonal hiatus. We will see you in 2011.

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Test post

Just checking the shift from WordPress.com to WordPress.org. As you can see, we’ve lost a little bit in translation. A few tweaks are obviously needed, so we’ll endeavour to get everything back to how it was as soon as possible. … Continue reading

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An approach of upbeat curation

It’s worth point out at the outset of this post that this particular weblog is not a forum for critical writing. Reading through a recent Blueprint article on the apparent lack of online architectural criticism (‘Critical Response’, not yet online) … Continue reading

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Collections and theme parks

The Wellcome Museum has a new exhibition, ‘Things‘. No relation, of course, although things was peripherally involved in the earlier Wellcome show, ‘The Phantom Museum‘, all about Henry Wellcome’s Collection of Medical Mysteries. The introduction to Hildi Hawkins and Danielle … Continue reading

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WordPress woes

At some point we need to move this weblog from WordPress.com, which we are finding weirdly odd and impossible to work with, to WordPress.org, which will apparently solve all our problems – i.e. provide CSS that is easy to edit. … Continue reading

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Sounds and shapes

The Record, Contemporary ART and VINYL is a site accompanying a new exhibition at the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University. There’s even a B-Side section that collates the various vinyl-infused sites that spring up around the web. Of … Continue reading

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Ego surfing and coffee table publishing

So how long before all contemporary coffee table books are iPad-enabled? From an outsider’s perspective, the iPad looks at its best when it’s providing a bit of depth beneath the still image, a way of peeling back layers, zooming in, … Continue reading

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