Boot sales, slums and hand-made railway lines

From a history of Suck.com: “HotWired had this crazy policy where they didn’t allow tertiary links, is what they called it. A tertiary link was when you linked to something that wasn’t explicitly referred to in the text. If I said, ‘Proctor & Gamble have a policy against suffocating infants,’ and I linked on ‘suffocating infants’ to the policy page on Proctor & Gamble, and it said, ‘All our products are tested for the risk of infant suffocation, and we have a strict policy,’ that’s a primary link. If I linked ‘suffocating infants’ to Dave Winer’s column, that would be a tertiary link. That was, by policy, not allowed at HotWired.” It was absurd, with a medium so new and unexplored, to establish such rules regarding what was and was not allowed. The lack of established rules was what made the web fun.’

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The Evolution of Snake, the story of a mobile game / ‘Alexander Gronsky’s “The Edge”, a series of shots taken along the outer boundary of Moscow’ at Mammoth / see also Siberian Ghost Cities, a collection of amazing-looking photographs that don’t necessarily tally with their captions (DRB isn’t exactly the National Geographic when it comes to reportage you can trust).

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Underground, by David Macaulay / Tarnow: 1000 years of modernity / Disasterville in the Cotswolds, ‘the Fire Service College where fire brigades from around the UK can go for training… Facilities include a ship, a high-rise, a stricken Boeing 737 and the M96 motorway- a fictional motorway for “simulated large vehicle incidents.”‘ At Markasaurus.

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What is proto:87 (via me-fi): proto:87 uses true to scale wheels and much narrower, almost true to scale width, turnout frog and guard rail flangeways… but you must have both the wheels and flangeways matched together, in order to run proto:87 trains!’. See also A Gooey Bowl of Rail, hand built points system at Bronx Terminal.

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The work of Dionisio Gonzalez at Subtopia. Slums as photoshopped slices of architectural deconstruction, their socio-economic betrayers confused by design complexity / new work by James Medcraft (a slice of whose Anatomy of Mainland Britain hangs on our wall): Car Boot Sale and Changing Landscape. We’d take issue slightly with his characterisation of the boot sale (‘Middle classes looking for a vintage bargain, working classes hunting for essentials; this project is a humanistic study of the cultural and social scales within this sub culture of trade.’)

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