Author Archives: things magazine

High and over

How much is a word worth? A surprising variety of figures, in our experience, all the way down to absolutely nothing / if you only visit one site today, make it Britain from Above / see also Locating London’s Past … Continue reading

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Here comes the bride

The former Wedding Palace in Tbilisi, by Victor Djorbenadze became the private house of the late oligarch Badri Patarkatsishvili, the definition of a colourful character. There only seems to be one plan available online, but it sort of backs up … Continue reading

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Markings and territories

The Enfield Poltergeist made for an an interesting episode of The Renunion / a map of Europe’s Roman roads / South Hill Park, a Brutalist masterpiece in North London, for sale / on hull markings and plimsoll lines: the secret … Continue reading

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Many lane blacktop

Brutal Destruction, for masochistic concrete lovers / impressive animated VR illustration by Matt Schaefer, via the Lawnmower Metaverse tumblr / fantastic auction of classic cars, prosaic and spectacular (including some great camper vans) / Conserve the Sound, remembering the sounds … Continue reading

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Two theatres and an ice rink

The Fighting Fantasy books are back, courtesy of a new title written by Charlie Higson. FF rivalled the Choose Your Own Adventure series, but both didn’t weather the rise of first computer text adventures and then just video gaming in … Continue reading

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The right to roam

The rise of the ‘walking simulator‘ suggests virtual tourism is a thing, albeit a thing in its infancy. The most intensive and sophisticated virtual worlds tend to be those created as the backdrops for big budget games, so the news … Continue reading

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Rows and rows

The evolution of flying to Australia / Daniel Eatock’s Repaired Cars / On the trail of Dougal Douglas, walking the Ballad of Peckham Rye / Cars Matching Homes, a tumblr / Volkswagen desert art installation / handy quick links to … Continue reading

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More nostalgia, carefully sequenced

A selection of things from around and about. ‘I looked through all 14,227 Apollo photos… and made GIFs‘ / The Overwhelming Emotion of Hearing Toto’s “Africa” Remixed to Sound Like It’s Playing in an Empty Mall. Seen also at MeFi … Continue reading

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Going underground

Manod: The Nation’s Treasure Caves, an exhibition about wartime picture storage, featuring photographs by Robin Friend / Side-By-Side Photos of Paris and Its Chinese Knockoff, by Francois Prost / an exhibition about The Great British Seaside. Could have done with … Continue reading

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Pale Bulbous Eyes

Why it’s Impossible to Accurately Measure a Coastline (via Nag on the Lake) / photographs of the Martian North Pole / For 10 Years, I Read the Comments: ‘Farewell to my stressful, dispiriting, but occasionally awesome life as an internet … Continue reading

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Obsessed with archives

The British Library is in the process of saving old sound recordings, often on obscure formats. The Museum of Obsolete Media has a timeline of audio formats (the data format timeline is just as intriguing. Related, the Sinclair ZX Microdrive … Continue reading

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Under the bridge

Drokk: Music inspired by Mega City One, by Geoff Barrow and Ben Salisbury (who also soundtracked Ex Machina and Annihilation) / a heavy metal restaurant / beautiful little animations of voxellated catastrophes by ultek85 / photographic projects by Jason Eskenazi … Continue reading

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In living colour

Unseen photos of East End London in glorious colour / sort of related, SHE F ELD, a tumblr devoted to glorious archive imagery of Sheffield / the Handbook of Tyranny deploys infographics to chart the world’s ills, inequalities and pressure … Continue reading

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Scaled down

Bitsy is a game-maker (via RPS) / more small things: Artifact series, the Forbidden Realm keycap. A little world on your keyboard / also small: tiny origami / in praise of random, passionately researched ephemera, with less web-based failed UX … Continue reading

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All over the place, again

Random bits from here and there. Julia Set Explorer, fun with fractals / Coffee Lids, a new book by Louise Harpman and Scott Specht, is subtitled ‘Peel, Pinch, Pucker and Puncture’. A taxonomic trawl through the many variations of the … Continue reading

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Trap street

A real mix. The world Chinese social credit (via MeFi) (and why Black Mirror isn’t helping) / a trip to the Aston Martin factory, circa 1999 / a well-curated Instagram from Caroline Reekie / NASA spends a lot on leaning … Continue reading

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Spinning around

A depressing piece about New Zealand’s potential future role as a home for disenfranchised billionaires (via MeFi) / the most interesting modern houses in Yorkshire / The Best Things Found Between the Pages of Old Books, at Atlas Obscura (via … Continue reading

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Things to watch

Things to watch. Night Windows, a short film by Ian Cross / a performance by suitmanjungle / Love Sport: Love Paintball, a short film by Studio AKA / a lovely film about the late architect Neave Brown / related,

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A year in review

How machine learning and “computer vision” will transform our cities / Micro campers from Japan / intricate drawings by Nicolas V. Sanchez (via tmn) / Alvaro Siza on Living in a House, at Reading Design / photography by Gerco de … Continue reading

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Merciful release

‘The boat’s been found and he’s not on it’: tragic sailor Donald Crowhurst’s final voyage, by his son. The Crowhurst story is endlessly fascinating. We especially love Tacita Dean’s book, Teignmouth Electron, and its associated imagery (e.g. Aerial View of … Continue reading

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