things magazine / about / what's new? / archive / photos / projects / order / rss / search
photography from the pre-flickr era
projects, scans and collections
Where is things 19/20?
What is things magazine?
The Pelican Project
thingsmagazine.tumblr.com
external links
0lll
2 or 3 things I know
aalog
actar
adam curtis
agence eureka
aggregat 4/5/6
alice the architect
all about nothing (x)
all things considered (x)
alphaville
alttext
ambit magazine
anarchitecture
and another thing
anti-mega
apothecary's drawer
arcspace
arch daily
archinect
archidose
archiveteam
architects' journal
architect's newspaper blog
architectural review
architectural ruminations
architecture.mnp
archnewsnow
arkitektur
art fag city
art is everywhere
art newspaper
arts journal
artnotes
ashleyb
atelier a+d
ateliermob
atlas (t)
atlas obscura
badaude
bad british architecture
bifurcated rivets
the big picture
blanketfort
bldg blog
blissblog
b'blog of 'israeli
boing boing
b******* to architecture
books from finland
booooooom
bottom drawer (x)
bouphonia
bowblog
bradley's almanac
buchanansmith
butterpaper
cabinet magazine
cabinet of wonders
candyland (x)
cartoonist (the)
cartype
caterina
city of sound
city comforts
collision detection
conscientious
continuity in architecture
coromandal
core77
coroflot
cosmopolitan scum
coudal
creative review blog
curious expeditions
daily jive
dancing bears (x)
daniel eatock
dark roasted blend
david thompson
death by architecture
delicious
delicious ghost
deputy dog (x)
derelict london
designboom
design bivouac
design observer
dezain
dezeen
diamond geezer
digitally distributed environments
diskant
efimera
eliot shepard
ephemera
excitement machine
eye of the goof
fantastic journal
fed by birds
feuilleton
ftrain
fireland
first drafts
five foot way
Ffffound!
further
future feeder
gadgets.fosfor.se
gapers block
giornale nuovo
greg
grow-a-brain
haddock
halvorsen
hat projects
hchamp
hello beautiful!
hot wheels
htc experiments
hyperkit
hyperreal and supercool
i like
iconeye.com
incoming signals
infinite thought
inhabitat
the interior prospect
irregular orbit
iso50
jean snow
joe moran's blog
josh rubin
judit bellostes
kanye west
kazys
keep left london
kosmograd
kottke
landliving
languagehat
largehearted boy
last plane to jakarta
lewism
life without buildings
lightningfield (x)
limited language (x)
literary saloon
loca london
london architecture diary
london review of books
low tech magazine
made by machines for people
made in china '69
magCulture
making light
mananarama
map room
material world
mcsweeneys
men's vogue daily
metafilter
metafilter projects
microkhan
militant esthetix
millennium people
mimoa
miss representation
mocoloco
moosifer jones' grouch
monocle
monoscope
mountain 7
mrs deane
music thing (x)
myrtle street
netdiver
no, 2 self
nothing to see here
noisy decent graphics
noticias arquitectura
NTK
nyclondon
obscure store
obsessive consumption
one plus one equals three
oobject
open brackets (x)
ouno design
overmorgen (x)
panopticist
parenthetically's
partIV (x)
pcl linkdump
the peel tapes
perpenduum
personism
platforma arquitectura
plasticbag (x)
pointingit (x)
polar intertia
plep
print fetish
quiet feather (x)
raccoon
rashomon
re: design news
reference library
rock, paper, shotgun
rodcorp
rogue semiotics
rolu
rossignol
rotational
route 79
russell davies
sachs report
salon
samuel pepys' diary
school of life
scrubbles
segal books
sensing architecture
sensory impact
sesquipedalist
sevensevennine
shape and colour
sharpeworld
shift
shorpy
sit down man, you're...
slow web
snopes
space and culture
spambot_stopper
speak up
spillway
spitting image
strange attractor
strange harvest
strange maps
strawdogs
subterranea britannica
subtopia
sugar-n-spicy
supercolossal
superspatial
swapatorium
swiss miss
tecnologia obsoleta
tecznotes
telstar logistics
tesugen
textism
that's how it happened
the art of where
the deep north
the letter
the model city
the moment blog
the morning news
the nonist
the northern light
the one train
the serif
the silver lining
the white noise revisited
they rule
things to look at
this isn't London
tom phillips
tomorrow's thoughts today
transpontine
turquoise days (x)
typographica
urban cartography
urbantick
vitamin q
voyou desoeuvre
vwork
wallpaper
we make money not art
we will become
weblogs.com
weburbanist
where (x)
white noise of everyday life
wikipedia
wikio
witold riedel
whole lotta nothing
wood s lot
wrong distance
xblog


weblog archives
eXTReMe Tracker
Tuesday, October 11, 2005
Flying Bombs and Rockets chronicles the devastation wrought on London by Germany's V-weapons during World War II. It's a hugely comprehensive chronicle of the 2419 'doodlebugs' and 500 V2 rockets launched at the capital in the last two years of the war, exploring where and when each bomb fell (including our immediate local area). The V weapons (V is usually translated as 'vengeance', but actually stood for 'Vergeltungswaffe', a compound word meaning 'compensation weapon') had the advantage of range yet were as indiscriminate as any other form of bombing, then and now. The New Cross bombing was one of the worst civilian tragedies of the war.

The terrifying fixed-position V3 was never operational before the war's end. Embedded within a French hillside, the 25 long-barrelled guns had a high rate of fire that would have swiftly destroyed London. The site at Mimoyecques is now a museum, and an eerie one at that; the extensive tunnels were carved by slave labour, tombs chipped from solid rock, with the tunnel walls scarred with hundreds of thousands of tiny indentations. An unknown number of workers died there, either in the terrible conditions or as a result of Allied bombing (which delayed the operation of the weapons until the war was over). Project Anvil, a top-secret yet abortive experiment to create remote-controlled, explosives-laden PB4Y-1 Liberators, apparently also targeted the site. Anvil was a troubled project, which claimed the life of JFK's older brother, Joe Kennedy in the process: read the US Navy's notification letter: 1, 2.

The Supergun concept didn't die with the war. The US Army worked on something called HARP, the High Altitude Research Project. HARP was the brainchild of McGill University professor Dr Gerald V.Bull, 'like a figure in a spy novel, designing arms for some of the world's harshest regimes.' Bull went where the money was, and in the Cold War, the money was American. HARP's initial intentions were relatively benign - it was designed as a low-cost satellite launcher. HARP used salvaged battleship guns to launch a small rocket known as a Martlet (named for the mythical bird on the crest of McGill University). The project faltered, a victim of inter-bureau rivalry.

Bull resurfaced in the 1980s, working for one Saddam Hussein on Project Babylon, a monstrous weapon that lurked in the Iraqi desert, unfired, until it was eventually dismantled by UN weapons inspectors. Project Babylon cost Bull his life - he was assassinated in Brussels in 1990, just another doomed engineer - and also kick-started Western dissatisfaction for Hussein's regime, mainly because those in power could no longer justify turning a blind eye to bits of 'oil pipeline' being shipped to a regime that swiftly went off message.

*

Other things. A classy obituary notice... 'in lieu of flowers...' / speculative alien biologies / why DVDs are the new giveaways / 020, a London entertainment guide / old things at Salvage One and Retrovius / the photography of Peter Granser / short movies at Patalab02 / watch bookmarks pop up live / Parallax View, Neoist Impulse, two weblogs / the official Happy Flowers website / sound effects, like many other media library services, are now available online, a loss for clip-art centric cover designs.

The ATP festival folk have announced their latest venture: The United Sounds of ATP. But aren't gigs getting just too retro? As the folk at diskant noted in a recent review of the Iggy and the Stooges Don't Look Back show, 'but it seems like the nail in the coffin for a band to have to go backwards like this. To look back,' before concluding that the show was actually one of the best things ever. Next thing you know, they'll be recreating seminal pairings from the long-forgotten past. Or creating all-new fusions of musical DNA.

Banville may have won the Booker, but who will win the Blooker? More to the point, how many websites have actually been turned into books? Besides Andrew Losowsky's Barcabook, of course. Are we a book based on a website? Or is it the other way around? One thing's for sure, we get picked up by lots of branding websites. Not quite sure why this should be. Sites like Rock'n'Roll and Advertising and brand new are fairly useful insights into the industry's self-conscious; what's good, what's bad, etc. etc.

Fact Check, keeping politicians honest / recipes at Burnt Toast / the architecture of the World Exhibition 1958 - better known as Expo 58, the show that spawned the Atomium / don't exhibit any Suspicious behaviour on the tube, although it's a moot point as to what 'suspicious behaviour' actually is these days / If it's got an engine, a motoring weblog / the flying Hydro Foam.

Caveman days with Og - Son of Fire, the original neanderthal from the Boy's Life paper ('The Magazine for all Boys, Publishing by the Boy Scouts of America'). Cover art is consistently interesting: squares, sneaking up on beavers, looking topically martial ('On to Washington!') in 1935, and fighting the heathen horde. Note, the NRA symbol in the top right has nothing to do with Charlton's lot, but is the symbol of the National Recovery Association, part of Roosevelt's New Deal (see also America in the 1930s site).